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Grief unites us as human beings. It is the most common of human experiences. Over the course of a lifetime, grief will visit. While unavoidable when “It” hits, few of us are prepared for all that sorrow brings.  We are not taught how to think, feel and react when losing those who give our lives meaning.  

There isn’t one way to face the loss of a beloved family member, friend or child.  If you are reading this, you know. Numbing disbelief, shock, perhaps blame, a deadening helplessness, unwanted anger and indescribable yearning, all or some of these feelings may intrude upon and fill your days and nights. Grief in process does not take one road.   


It feels inescapable and lasts for much longer than other people (the non-bereaved) think it should. Like an open wound, it begs our tending.
— Dr. Joanne Cacciatore

Parent     Child     Friend     Sister     Brother     Grandparent


What is grief counseling?

As a grief specialist, I have learned to walk into another’s world of pain. I have come to understand that grief has many faces. It does not have an expiration date. Grief’s weight often crushes those left behind.  My practice is a reflection of an understanding of grief reactions and how best to guide the bereaved through loss. I cannot say my goal is to fill that place in your heart or that together we can hurry up grief. Instead, with careful compassion, we chart a course that includes your loss and your love.


What is the cost?

Because everyone's situation varies, I review a client's needs case by case to determine a fee for the services to be provided. Please contact me today to discuss how I can help support you through this difficult time of losing your loved one.


Each person’s grief is like some other person’s grief, each person’s grief is like no other person’s grief.
— J. Worden, 2009
Of all the challenges you face in working through grief, none is more demanding than the endurance it requires. It begins with 365 days of “the first time without”, but it doesn’t end there.
— Bob Dietz, 2012